Reviews

Fulton Drill Press LED Light Review

Fulton Drill Press LED Light

For doing woodworks, lighting arrangement plays an important role. Installation of a simple LED light on your drill press will compensate for poor visibility while working with the machine somewhere in a low-light condition. With a quick and cheap modification, you can illuminate your spindle easily.

Are you looking for a set of Drill Press Led Light? Then, our Fulton Drill Press LED Light review is exactly written for you. Moreover, Fulton Drill Press LED Light is ideal for DIYers and professionals.

Feature Analysis

1. Thumb Screw Installation

Fulton Drill Press LED Light comes with three thumb screws with rubber tips. In a minute, you can install it on drill press. It suits a quill that ranges 1-5/8″ to 3-7/8″ diameter.

2. No More Shadows

The construction with 14 LED lights and corded switch that can be fixed with magnet. The circular ring can fit quills of drill press with diameter from 1-5/8″ to 3-7/8″. The drill press project shadows wherever the quill goes. If you install this light ring, then it follows the drill presses with quill to provide a constant light support.

3. Manual Power Source

The Fulton Drill Press LED Light can be powered from the nearest source. This means you do not need to worry about DC batteries.

Specifications

  • Material: glass
  • Power Source: Manual
  • Number of LED: 14

Pros

  • Easy to install
  • 14 LED lights to produce lights.
  • Corded switch for easy control.
  • Manual power source

Cons

  • Vibration reduces magnetic intensity after 120-minute restless use.

Final Verdict

The magnetic base of the switch might loosen up over time due to continuous vibration of the drill press. If you usually work for two hours or longer at a stretch, this product might bring some disappointment. So, working under poor lighting conditions may not be an issue if you can use it for under an hour at a time.

 

About the author

Willie Osgood

An Avid Metalworker

Willie doesn’t really consider himself an artist, rather a craftsman involved in practical trades. Yet, most of his projects require him to make interesting and fine objects. Being the eldest son of a carpenter, his background is 100 percent rooted in crafting. He found the art of blacksmithing quite appealing since his teenage years… that fire, the sound of swinging hammers, and those long and shiny blades that came out as a finished product. Soon he literally became obsessed with metal – the way it moved, worked, and changed when heated or cooled.

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